(placeholder)
(placeholder)

Tales From the Anthropocene

featuring Beth's avatar, Judy the Leading Light

(placeholder)

This is Judy  


Judy shares the spirit of the Data-A Art  movement its voice and concerns. She is as sophisticated as she is a visionary.  Judy has been performing in the public eye with me since 2004 highlighting a great number of exhibits. There is an ongoing series about Judy covering female iconic legends as well as how she impersonates groundbreaking esthetic ideals on Facebook.  Please click the link above to see the series and like her page.   


2011-present

(placeholder)
(placeholder)
(placeholder)
(placeholder)

Tales from the Anthropocene was born in 2011 out of my great need to be able to say something about how we as humans treat each other and the rest of life on our planet.  

Judy is my Avatar, the Storyteller; she gets to say the things I would normally not say.  In this series, Judy's presence anchors the context of visions in which the reconciliation between human nature and Nature itself is unfolding.

The effect of our civilization and its negative consequences on the future of all life will have to be counteracted by more than just the same cultural context which got us here in the first place.  The Nature and I thesis behind this series is an embrace of mentality which may result from our ascent to become coauthors with Nature to  benefit all of LIFE on earth.

The Tales from the Anthropocene series consists of 67 canvases thus far chronicling the interventions of Judy, the avatar of my creation, who takes on the conscious character of a scout of the future in the different world of the Anthropocene.  Shown is just a small sampling of the series.  

(placeholder)
(placeholder)
(placeholder)

Just How Did We Become the Property of Man

80” x 60”

Mixed Media on Canvas


Beth's Narrative for the work:

Well, while there isn't a definitive when, there is certainly a definitive how and an undeniable who.  The how, was a progressively enforced assertion that women owed servitude to the hunter-warrior-provider-protector and father of the children; Women took care of the hearth and ran the business of raising children.

The who, is the same villain that is responsible for the many variations of that absurd and damaging idea that has brought forth so much misery to women throughout history; The human cultural context!

Let the culture evolve and that ridiculous myth will be restored into the parity or equality that Nature had in mind all along as the basis and stability of all life.


We Ought To Be Able To Save This Place

40” x 53”

Mixed Media On Canvas


Beth's narrative for the work:

For all of the shortcomings and incredible errors we have committed on our way to this moment in history.  There is always the consolation that we are capable of dramatic acts of kindness and hugely creative ability.  Therefore while the road ahead is demanding and all odds against us, we should prevail if we decide that we will.



(placeholder)
(placeholder)

Dreaming Of What Is

40” x 53”

Mixed Media On Canvas


Beth's Narrative for the Work:

Everything we can see in the world or in our mind is a result of a long and complex history of a fantastically number of histories bundled over time into one.  Reality is just that.  What is would therefore change from moment to moment; being part of the moment, is to move on with the reality of what is, even in a dream.



There Is More To Freedom Than Just The Word

53” x 40”

Mixed Media On Canvas


Beth's Narrative for the Work:

Freedom is perhaps the most common of all desires known to humanity and unsurprisingly the least fulfilled want.  While there is a price for everything and everything has a price, freedom is about being comfortable in the moment as it moves through time and now time defines our experience of life.


(placeholder)

Gaia Dressed For An Unwanted Sunset

53” x 40”

Mixed Media On Canvas


Beth's narrative for the work:

As we begin to respond to the effect of our activity on the world's environment, we find that nature as personified by the idea of Gaia, is already showing the extent of the damage and neglect in a manner that predisposes the sights of a sad and unwanted sunset for life on earth.



Can You Feel It

40” x 53”

Mixed Media On Canvas


Beth's Narrative for the Work:

Probably not as one cannot feel something that one doesn't know exists.  That is the great challenge for humanity at present as what the eyes of science see happening to the earth's biosphere is a view that our cultural context cannot embrace while unable to see it.


(placeholder)
(placeholder)
(placeholder)

Fall Speaks So Clearly About Continuity

40” x 53”

Mixed Media On Canvas


Beth's narrative for the work:

Long Term planning is not one of the things we humans do.  One can only count the number of civilizations that have collapsed and are long gone to account for that.  Happily, Nature is the long term planning master.  Fall is a season that which has come on time each year for eons and just now we are coming around to learn what all other life already knows about continuity.



This is a Web That Should Not Be Broken

40" x 53"

Mixed Media on Canvas


Beth's Narrative for the Work:

In the youth of humanity, all of the fruit, all of the animals and alll of the fishes were the property of humanity to do as they pleased.  We chose to squander the gift and perhaps just in a nick of time, at the dawn of our maturity as a species, we know that the gift is disappearing and that its fabric holds our own survival in its web.

(placeholder)

Sustainable Continuity Is The Way

53" x 40"

Mixed Media On Canvas

Beth's Narrative for the Work:

Sustainable continuity is just a view of what may lay ahead of what we can learn about life beyond unsustainable consumption of what is left of the planet. One will hope that there is enough future for our children, where the view ahead has a way to use and to sustain in continuity enough for their children.



(placeholder)

to see the full catalog of works from this project please contact Beth directly

All images, work, and text © Beth Carter Bell 2016